The Dreamthiefs Daughter: A Tale of the Albino (Dreamquest Trilogy, Book 1)

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While searching out copies for a recent re-read my own volumes are stored away , much to my surprise I found that there were additional tales crafted only a decade or so ago.

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So, while he remains bound to the mast of a ship, his astral being if you will roams the multiverse serving as one aspect of the Eternal Champion. I will make a few comments on the story and the writing, though. If you remember the frenzy and energy of the original stories; The Stealer of Souls , Stormbringer , The Vanishing Tower , Elric of Melnibone , and so on, they were very fast-paced.

Indeed the first two novels read like a whirlwind. I found this book to feel and read more like the later Eternal Champion novels e. There is more description without immediate action and personal observations. I say this not as a criticism, but just to describe how it differs from the earlier works. Remember this is not his homeworld. The balance of forces, magic, and science is different, so why should the story read the same?

Variations on a Theme

He sprinkles many references to his own works throughout the book both to tie it in to his multiverse, but also to engage the reader at many levels and maybe to amuse himself, as well. I remembered a book from my library. The author, perhaps the pseudonym for an ancestor, claimed to have visited an underground kingdom, a refuge for the disposed, whose natives were more stone than flesh. So, spoilers aside, I will say that I was happy to read the further adventures of the White Wolf.

I have read and will review the third novel, but the BPL has let me down on the second volume. Four Stars 4. View 1 comment. Sep 18, John rated it really liked it. The Dreamthief's Daughter by Michael Moorcock Earthlight, pages, hardback, In pre-WWII Germany, with the Nazis on the ascendant, Count Ulric von Bek is one of the many who look upon developments with dismay but a largely passive dismay, for fear of the bully-boys.

He is not allowed to continue thus, however, for the Nazis, in the person of his cousin Prince Gaynor von Minct, seek the ancestral sword of the von Bek family, Ravenbrand, as well as the Holy Grail, also entrusted to the family but reputedly lost by von Bek's mad father.

Von Bek contacts the Resistance, and, with the enigmatic Herr El and the lovely wildling Oona, who is like himself an albino, makes plans to retain the status quo. Before much can come of any Resistance schemes, Gaynor has von Bek thrown into a concentration camp where, despite physical torture, he declines to reveal the location of Ravenbrand.

At length, as he nears death, the albino of his dreams appears magically with Oona and an enigmatic British agent, Oswald Bastable, to free him. They flee to Hameln where, … la Pied Piper, von Bek splits open a rock using the regained Ravenbrand and they enter a subterranean realm, Mu-Ooria, populated by the mentally superhuman Off-Moo.

The White Wolf's Son: The Albino Underground

Here they are pursued by Gaynor and his Nazi demon sidekick Klosterheim. The dual entity returns to Tanelorn, where as Elric it discovers that Gaynor has ambitions far beyond the mundane ones of the Nazis: through forming a duplicitous alliance with the Goddess of Law, Miggea, Gaynor hopes to overthrow Chaos and gain the rule of all the multiverse. Elric, as an arch-prince of Chaos, must resist him. In the end, of course, the balance between Chaos and Law is restored, at least for now.

The four sections succeed to greater and lesser mostly greater extents. The Mu-Ooria sequences, with their Edgar Rice Burroughsian ambience, in the telling hark back even further, to the sort of 19th- or even 18th-century otherworld fantasy in which the otherworld itself is deemed to be of such marvel that the reader is intended to be entertained by somewhat painstaking, plodding accounts of the geography and populace rather than any plot advancement. There are longueurs here and also a sense of alienation on the writer's part, as if Moorcock recognized while writing them that the sequences were failing to lift off the ground but could not abandon them because this section of the book is integral to the rest.

That rest, by contrast, in general sings. Von Bek's experiences in Nazi Germany, and his growing knowledge that he is part of a greater mystery, are as gripping as any World War II adventure story. Von Bek is at one and the same time both Elric and not-Elric, and that duality persists even once their two identities have fused. The same obviously is true of Elric, who is both von Bek and not-von Bek. Elric's sword Stormbringer and the von Bek family's sword Ravenbrand have a single identity, even though they are physically twain and remain so, even when in proximity.

Oona is both a daughter and a lover to the double identity that is Elric- von Bek. Gaynor is at one and the same time a human being and an eternal Evil Principle. There are other examples. That this is in fact a true nature of reality is plausible in a post-Heisenberg frame of reference whose analogue might be Chaos, by contrast with Newtonian-style Law , which sees identity as a transient property, dependent upon, among other factors, the act of perception. This is also an intensely political novel. The relevance of this is obvious when Nazism is the despotism under consideration; but there are not so subtly encoded references to other, more recent, "democratic despots" of the Right.

Here, for example, is Moorcock's description of the world Miggea and her rule of Law have created: Miggea's was no ordinary desert. It was all that remained of a world destroyed by Law. No hawks soared in the pale blue sky. Not an insect. Not a reptile. No water. No lichen. No plants of any kind. Just tall spikes of crystallized ash and limestone, crumbling and turned into crazy shapes by the wind, like so many grotesque gravestones. They have the taste of the worst Hollywood producers and the egos of the worst Hollywood actors. We have come to an ironic moment in history, I think, when actors and entertainers determine the fate of the real world.

Moorcock's contempt for the politicians of Law is of course allowed to be seen more naked when the subjects under consideration are safely distant in history, like the Nazis and in brief references the Stalinist despots of Soviet Russia. Hess and by implication his colleagues in the Nazi hierarchy are portrayed as what Brian Stableford has termed "lifestyle fantasists", the attempted reification of their particular brand of insane and simplifying fantasies involving, of course, untold human suffering.

As mentioned, there are some doldrums in this book, but they are in a relatively early part of it and easily ploughed through. It is one of those rare fantasies that merits repeated reading with, each time, a different facet of its full meaning to be derived. Aug 15, Jamie Connolly rated it it was amazing Shelves: the-multiverse , books.

Eternal Champion (character) - Wikipedia

Elric and von bek nazis. Gaynor the damned. The holy grail. The dreamthiefs daughter. A little of everything. Like all of moorcocks books, 5 stars. Aug 26, Scott rated it it was ok Shelves: fantasy. I was a huge fan of this author in my youth and I still recall the original Elric saga and the other books I read at the time fondly, but this return to his work after so many years was a disappointment. I actually enjoyed the first third or so of this story quite a bit. There is no fantastical aspect yet, and it depicts Count Ulric of Bek's view of the rise of Nazism in his beloved Germany.

Ulric's ambitious cousin Gaynor has joined up with Hitler, though he sees him only as a stepping stone to I was a huge fan of this author in my youth and I still recall the original Elric saga and the other books I read at the time fondly, but this return to his work after so many years was a disappointment. Ulric's ambitious cousin Gaynor has joined up with Hitler, though he sees him only as a stepping stone to something greater. He demands Ulric turn over a family heirloom, the sword Ravenbrand, but Ulric, seeing the Nazis for what they are, refuses, and is thrown into prison and then a concentration camp for his trouble.

It's once Elric shows up and teams with Ulric initially occupying the same body that I began to become bored. And so he does. This recurring deus ex machina sucks any drama or tension out of the story. There's also a lot of smaller scale mystical hand-waving stuff that had the same effect. After the first act, I felt no weight to any of the action.

Even the ending doesn't require much on Elric's or Ulric's part. I guess I would have preferred this as a pure historical novel, or at least something a bit more down to earth.

View 2 comments. The premise for this book is bizarre. Elric fighting Nazis? Pathways to other dimensions? I was prepared to go "what?! Instead, I only went "what?! Oh, and at the civilization living under the earth. In terms of the main storyline, it's surprisingly enjoyable.


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As the story is told from the point of view of Elric's 'avatar', Ulric von Bek, the langu The premise for this book is bizarre. As the story is told from the point of view of Elric's 'avatar', Ulric von Bek, the language is less high fantasy and more modern prose, which means you can read it for longer periods of time without feeling the need to get away from some excruciatingly melodramatic sentences as much as I love the original series, this was the problem I had.

Ulric is a engrossing character in his own right, possibly even more likeable than Elric as he is human and therefore comes with all the appropriate moral baggage.

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Jan 22, Derek rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy , elric , fiction , gothic , eternal-champion , exotic-fantasy. Some might find it a bit vain and trite, but I rather enjoyed this way of explicitly tying everything in his multiverse together. The use of the Nazis as a representation of pure evil was a bit cliche, and the tone of his musings about the Nazis was a bit self-righteous. But I rather like the overall story arch, the use of this different avatar of the Eternal Champion to narrate the story of Elric was nice.

It seems that with Gaynor the Damned, Moorcock finally found a worthy and interesting nemesis for his White Wolf. Dec 04, Michael Battaglia rated it it was amazing. It's been a while since I've read an actual Eternal Champion novel. Years ago I devoured White Wolf's reprinting of Moorcock's entire Eternal Champion series, including most of his early novels and ones that had been retrofitted to become Eternal Champion stories.

Its a sprawling series that's undoubtedly confusing to new readers, akin to going to a party that's been going on for a week where the host keeps changing and thus the nature of the party itself. In that light, there's no real good ent It's been a while since I've read an actual Eternal Champion novel. In that light, there's no real good entry point other than just picking your Champion and diving right in.